Cartoon of the Day: Glenn McCoy

Glenn McCoy hits it again.

Dinosaur Media Alert: Rocky Mountain News Folds

The Rocky Mountain News is folding. The last edition is Friday.

Rocky Mountain News to close, publish final edition Friday Rocky Mountain News Published February 26, 2009 at 12:01 p.m.
Updated February 26, 2009 at 3:02 p.m.

Joe Mahoney © The Rocky

Executives from E.W. Scripps Co., announce their decision on the future of the Rocky Mountain News in the 150-year-old newspaper’s newsroom on 2/26/09 in Denver. In December 2008, the Rocky’s parent company put the paper up for sale, citing multi-million dollar annual losses.

Rich Boehne, CEO of E.W. Scripps Co., announce their decision to close the Rocky Mountain News in the 150-year-old newspaper's newsroom on 2/26/09 in Denver. In December 2008, the Rocky's parent company put the paper up for sale, citing multi-million dollar annual losses.

Photo by Joe Mahoney © The Rocky Rich Boehne, CEO of E.W. Scripps Co., announce their decision to close the Rocky Mountain News in the 150-year-old newspaper’s newsroom on 2/26/09 in Denver. In December 2008, the Rocky’s parent company put the paper up for sale, citing multi-million dollar annual losses.

A man stops to read the ticker on the outside of the Denver Newspaper  Agency building announcing that the Rocky Mountain News is closing and that it will publish its last edition on Friday. Photograph taken in Denver Thurs. Feb 26, 2009.

Photo by Darin McGregor © The Rocky

A man stops to read the ticker on the outside of the Denver Newspaper Agency building announcing that the Rocky Mountain News is closing and that it will publish its last edition on Friday. Photograph taken in Denver Thurs. Feb 26, 2009.

 Executives from E.W. Scripps Co., announce their decision on the future of the Rocky Mountain News in the 150-year-old newspaper's newsroom on 2/26/09 in Denver. In December 2008, the Rocky's parent company put the paper up for sale, citing multi-million dollar annual losses.

Photo by Joe Mahoney © The Rocky

Executives from E.W. Scripps Co., announce their decision on the future of the Rocky Mountain News in the 150-year-old newspaper’s newsroom on 2/26/09 in Denver. In December 2008, the Rocky’s parent company put the paper up for sale, citing multi-million dollar annual losses.

Executives from E.W. Scripps Co., announce their decision on the future of the Rocky Mountain News in the 150-year-old newspaper's newsroom on 2/26/09 in Denver. In December 2008, the Rocky's parent company put the paper up for sale, citing multi-million dollar annual losses.

Photo by Joe Mahoney © The Rocky

Executives from E.W. Scripps Co., announce their decision on the future of the Rocky Mountain News in the 150-year-old newspaper’s newsroom on 2/26/09 in Denver. In December 2008, the Rocky’s parent company put the paper up for sale, citing multi-million dollar annual losses.

The Rocky Mountain News publishes its last paper tomorrow.

Rich Boehne, chief executive officer of Rocky-owner Scripps, broke the news to the staff at noon today, ending nearly three months of speculation over the paper’s future.

“People are in grief,” Editor John Temple said at a news conference later.

Boehne told staffers that the Rocky was the victim of a terrible economy and an upheaval in the newspaper industry.

“Denver can’t support two newspapers any longer,” Boehne told staffers, some of whom cried at the news. “It’s certainly not good news for you, and it’s certainly not good news for Denver.”

On Dec. 4, Boehne announced that Scripps was looking for a buyer for the Rocky and its 50 percent interest in the Denver Newspaper Agency, the company that handles business matters for the papers. The move came because of financial losses in Denver, including $16 million in 2008.

“This moment is nothing like any experience any of us have had,” Boehne said. “The industry is in serious, serious trouble.”

At a news conference later, Editor John Temple said he was optimistic about the future of journalism but added that newspapers would be “radically different” in the future. He said he had no plans for his own future, although Boehne said Temple has a job with Scripps if he wants it.

Boehne said there was an out-of-state nibble from only one potential buyer, who withdrew after realizing that it would cost as much as $100 million “just to stay in the game.”

BOHICA

Despite all of BO’s campaign rhetoric, BO’s administration will be asking congress to reinstate, permanently, the “Assault Weapons Ban” that expired during the Bush administration.

Story on ABC News. View the complete article here.

Obama to Seek New Assault Weapons Ban
The Ban Expired in 2004 During the Bush Administration.

The Obama administration will seek to reinstate the assault weapons ban that expired in 2004 during the Bush administration, Attorney General Eric Holder said today.

PHOTO Wednesday Attorney General Eric Holder said that the Obama administration will seek to reinstitute the assault weapons ban which expired in 2004 during the Bush administration.
Wednesday Attorney General Eric Holder said that the Obama administration will seek to reinstitute the assault weapons ban which expired in 2004 during the Bush administration.

(AP Photos/ABC News Graphic )

“As President Obama indicated during the campaign, there are just a few gun-related changes that we would like to make, and among them would be to reinstitute the ban on the sale of assault weapons,” Holder told reporters.

Holder said that putting the ban back in place would not only be a positive move by the United States, it would help cut down on the flow of guns going across the border into Mexico, which is struggling with heavy violence among drug cartels along the border.

“I think that will have a positive impact in Mexico, at a minimum.” Holder said at a news conference on the arrest of more than 700 people in a drug enforcement crackdown on Mexican drug cartels operating in the U.S.

Political Test

I don’t necessarily agree with their definition of a “Social Liberal” and “Economic Fairness”, but, that is what the Political Test says I am.

Via Breda, I am…


You are a

Social Liberal
(60% permissive)


and an…

Economic Conservative

(80% permissive)
Capitalist


You are best described as a:

You exhibit a very well-developed sense of Right and Wrong and believe in economic fairness.

Dinosaur Media Watch: San Francisco Chronicle

Another print rag heading for extinction. The SF Chronicle will either be sold or closed if no buyer can be found. The diminishing fortunes of the print media is no surprise. When Journalism is reduced to printing nothing but liberal propaganda, when “truth” and “facts” mean whatever the writer wants them to mean, when the reporting of events are slanted to support a personal or corporate agenda, the result is a loss of readership and a loss of income.

One beltway wag has proposed federal subsidies for the dying papers. If that happens, it only acknowledges what the public already knows: Journalism is dead and now subsists as a governmental/liberal publicity organ.

Here is an except from Yahoo News.


Troubled San Francisco paper in danger of closing
Tuesday February 24, 8:24 pm ET


San Francisco Chronicle to be sold or closed if owner can’t lower expenses dramatically SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The San Francisco Chronicle joined the lengthening list of imperiled newspapers Tuesday as its owner set out to purge the payroll and slash other expenses in a last-ditch effort to reverse years of heavy losses.

If it can’t reduce expenses dramatically within the next few weeks, the Hearst Corp. said it will close or sell the Chronicle, northern California’s largest newspaper with a paid weekday circulation of 339,430.

Dinosaur Media Watch: San Francisco Chronicle

Another print rag heading for extinction. The SF Chronicle will either be sold or closed if no buyer can be found. The diminishing fortunes of the print media is no surprise. When Journalism is reduced to printing nothing but liberal propaganda, when “truth” and “facts” mean whatever the writer wants them to mean, when the reporting of events are slanted to support a personal or corporate agenda, the result is a loss of readership and a loss of income.

One beltway wag has proposed federal subsidies for the dying papers. If that happens, it only acknowledges what the public already knows: Journalism is dead and now subsists as a governmental/liberal publicity organ.

Here is an except from Yahoo News.


Troubled San Francisco paper in danger of closing
Tuesday February 24, 8:24 pm ET


San Francisco Chronicle to be sold or closed if owner can’t lower expenses dramatically SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The San Francisco Chronicle joined the lengthening list of imperiled newspapers Tuesday as its owner set out to purge the payroll and slash other expenses in a last-ditch effort to reverse years of heavy losses.

If it can’t reduce expenses dramatically within the next few weeks, the Hearst Corp. said it will close or sell the Chronicle, northern California’s largest newspaper with a paid weekday circulation of 339,430.

More on Mexico’s fragmation

Just came across this. Texas is preparing for a worst-case scenario if Mexico continues to go down the tubes.

If Violence Escalates in Mexico, Texas Officials Plan to Be Ready

Thursday , February 12, 2009

By Joshua Rhett Miller

FC1

As drug cartels continue to terrorize Mexico, Texas officials are planning for the worst-case scenario: how to respond if the violence spills over the border, and what to do if thousands of Mexicans seek refuge in the United States.

Katherine Cesinger, a spokeswoman for Texas Gov. Rick Perry, said a multi-agency contingency plan is being developed, and it will focus primarily on law enforcement issues, including how to handle an influx of Mexicans fleeing violence.

“At this point, what we’re focusing on is spillover violence,” Cesinger told FOXNews.com Thursday. “The immediate concern, if any, would be that.”

More than 5,300 people were killed in Mexico last year in connection to criminal activity, and some experts predict things will get worse. Along with Pakistan, Mexico was identified in a Department of Defense report last year as a country that could destabilize rapidly.

If that were to happen, officials are concerned that the drug violence could cross the Rio Grande into southern Texas.

Cesinger said the plan currently does not address a potential flood of refugees, though “It may be something that comes into consideration.”

“Worst-case scenario, Mexico becomes the Western hemisphere’s equivalent of Somalia, with mass violence, mass chaos,” said Ted Galen Carpenter, vice president for defense and foreign policy at the Cato Institute, a Washington-based think tank. “That would clearly require a military response from the United States.”

Carpenter, who recently authored a study entitled “Troubled Neighbor: Mexico’s Drug Violence Poses a Threat to the United States,” said Mexican government could collapse, although it’s unlikely.

“That’s still a relative longshot, but it’s not out of the question,” Carpenter said. “It’s obviously prudent for all of the states along the U.S.-Mexican border and the military to consider that possibility and not get blindsided should it happen.”

Some lawmakers in Texas have begun questioning how to deal with a potentially massive influx of Mexican citizens.

“Do you strengthen the borders so people cannot get in by the thousands every day, or do you create detention centers where people are held until their status is determined?” asked state Sen. Dan Patrick. “This is a potential refugee problem…”

“Let’s pray that this does not develop in Mexico,” Patrick told FOXNews.com. “However, when you hear the president of the United States cast dire warnings on our country, that even our financial system could collapse, it makes you think. If the United States can face catastrophe, obviously Mexico could as well.

“We have to seriously consider that as a remote possibility, so therefore, we need to have a plan.”

Patrick called upon Texas Homeland Security Director Steve McGraw to present a comprehensive plan to the state’s Legislature.

McGraw, who reportedly told lawmakers at a recent border security meeting that fears of Mexico’s collapse were “well-grounded,” was unavailable to comment Thursday, Cesinger said.

Former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff indicated last month that the continuing violence has prompted plans for civilian and military law enforcement should it spread into the United States.

Chertoff said the plan calls for armored vehicles, aircraft and teams of personnel along border hotspots. Military forces, however, would be summoned only if civilian agencies like the Border Patrol were unable to control the violence, the New York Times reported.

DHS spokeswoman Amy Kudwa said the department began developing the plan last summer to address a “broad spectrum of contingencies that could occur” if the violence escalates.

“This violence is happening because the [Felipe] Calderon administration is doing the right thing by cracking down on powerful drug cartels,” Kudwa said in a statement. “The cartels are, predictably, fighting back to protect their lucrative criminal livelihood. This plan doesn’t change or otherwise supersede existing authorities; it plans for how a number of government organizations would respond and coordinate if local resources were to be overwhelmed.”

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano is “continuing to develop that plan,” Kudwa said Thursday.

Meanwhile, Tim Irwin, spokesman for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, said he was unaware of any plans in Texas to prepare for an influx of Mexicans seeking refuge. Theoretically, Irwin said, a Mexican citizen could go to a border crossing and seek asylum based on fears of returning home amid the ongoing drug wars.

“It’s a valid claim to make, but you’d need to back that up,” Irwin said. “That would start the process.”

Irwin said the individual would be initially detained and given a “credible fear interview” to determine if his or her concerns are valid. If so, they could be eventually be released into the United States.

But Carpenter said the worst-case scenario — a “sudden surge” of up to 1 million refugees in addition to the hundreds of thousands who enter illegally each year — would be daunting.

“That would be very difficult to handle,” Carpenter told FOXNews.com. “I suspect what’d you see fairly soon is an attempt to seal the border as much as possible. That would probably be the initial response, along with the building of additional facilities [to detain the Mexican refugees]. But nobody wants to see that happen.”