Scandal du Jour

More corruption have been unearthed in Washington, DC—again in the State Department. It seems their DSS, the Diplomatic Security Service, which is the department’s security service has been hiring prostitutes while on duty, engaged in “sexual assaults” on foreign nationals, and falsifying reports, among other things.

After the revelation of NSA snooping last week, it seems that every day there is another discovery of corruption and/or violations of law or the Constitution. It really makes you wonder what is coming next. All of this is a prime example of Congress enacting laws they do not understand, have zero concept of ‘unintended consequences’, or in the case of many democrats, simply don’t care it the law enhances their chances for re-election. There are a number of ‘Pubs defending the NSA as well.

It all makes one ask, “What resource do we have when the Constitution is ignored and no longer protects us?” Not many. Public opinion is about it…and the ballot box. The dems (and some ‘Pubs) are working hard to remove that second option, (Motor-Voter, continuing large-scale vote fraud, the Gang of Eights Immigration bill, etc.) Julian Assange claims the “rule of law” is collapsing in the US. He may be correct.

The PTBs (Powers That Be) claim the NSA leaker is a Chinese agent because he fled to Hong Kong. He may well be. That does not, however, invalidate his claims—in fact, once exposed, the NSA/CIA have tacitly admitted PRISM exists and has existed for years. The program’s supporters claim information skimmed by PRISM, prevented a terrorist subway attack in 2009.

Really? Perhaps. But how many individuals’ privacy was violated in the process? We don’t know—and that is the crux of the matter. How much do we not know. Supposedly, Congress was informed. So we were told. Then is was discovered that only a few congressmen in some oversight committees were told—and not everyone in those committees, only a select few.

It makes you wonder why some were told and why were others not informed? Hmmm? Obama claims all of Congress was briefed. Members of Congress, including some democrats, refute that claim.

It is interesting that Obama is even losing the rank ‘n file dem congressmen on this scandal.

Henry V, Act IV, Scene 3

My high school English teacher was an older, unmarried lady who had a, well let’s say, a risque reputation when she was younger. My parents knew her for years and when I was a high school sophomore, she was my teacher.

She loved Shakespeare. We were required to read a number of Shakespeare’s plays and his poetry. I barely passed. At age 15, Shakespeare didn’t interest me.

Fast forward four years. I’m now in college and once again I’m in an English lit class and we’re reading Shakespeare’s “historical” play, the Henrys, Richard the Third, and a few of his comedies. I’ve forgotten the instructor’s name. It’s been over fifty years. I do remember he read to us in class, in dialect of the times. Shakespeare became real. It became one of my favorite classes.

It was a four credit-hour class. We met four times a week and we spent a week on Henry the Fifth, one of Shakespeare’s most well known and most quoted plays. One of those famous quotes is  in Act IV, Scene 3 when Henry is in France, at Agincourt…on St. Crispin’s Day eve.

SCENE III. The English camp.

Enter GLOUCESTER, BEDFORD, EXETER, ERPINGHAM, with all his host: SALISBURY and WESTMORELAND

GLOUCESTER

Where is the king?

BEDFORD

The king himself is rode to view their battle.

WESTMORELAND

Of fighting men they have full three score thousand.

EXETER

There’s five to one; besides, they all are fresh.

SALISBURY

God’s arm strike with us! ’tis a fearful odds.
God be wi’ you, princes all; I’ll to my charge:
If we no more meet till we meet in heaven,
Then, joyfully, my noble Lord of Bedford,
My dear Lord Gloucester, and my good Lord Exeter,
And my kind kinsman, warriors all, adieu!

BEDFORD

Farewell, good Salisbury; and good luck go with thee!

EXETER

Farewell, kind lord; fight valiantly to-day:
And yet I do thee wrong to mind thee of it,
For thou art framed of the firm truth of valour.
Exit SALISBURY

BEDFORD

He is full of valour as of kindness;
Princely in both.
Enter the KING

WESTMORELAND

O that we now had here
But one ten thousand of those men in England
That do no work to-day!

KING HENRY V

What’s he that wishes so?
My cousin Westmoreland? No, my fair cousin:
If we are mark’d to die, we are enow
To do our country loss; and if to live,
The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
God’s will! I pray thee, wish not one man more.
By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,
Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost;
It yearns me not if men my garments wear;
Such outward things dwell not in my desires:
But if it be a sin to covet honour,
I am the most offending soul alive.
No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from England:
God’s peace! I would not lose so great an honour
As one man more, methinks, would share from me
For the best hope I have. O, do not wish one more!
Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host,
That he which hath no stomach to this fight,
Let him depart; his passport shall be made
And crowns for convoy put into his purse:
We would not die in that man’s company
That fears his fellowship to die with us.
This day is called the feast of Crispian:
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say ‘To-morrow is Saint Crispian:’
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars.
And say ‘These wounds I had on Crispin’s day.’
Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,
But he’ll remember with advantages
What feats he did that day: then shall our names.
Familiar in his mouth as household words
Harry the king, Bedford and Exeter,
Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester,
Be in their flowing cups freshly remember’d.
This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne’er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remember’d;
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition:
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin’s day.

Now, let’s move forward nearly 700 years and revise Henry’s speech into modern terms. It is still potent and applicable today—with a bit of tongue-in-cheek.

Henry V, Act IV, Scene 3.

Henry V, Act IV, Scene 3, Revised.