(Updated 10:00AM) Do these people really think before they speak!?!?

Update: 10AM.  We’ve another example of dems who think our Constitution, Republic and democratic principles are just too…“too much of a good thing.” 
The former director’s of Obama’s Office of Management and Budget, Peter Orszag, thinks so.  In a column he wrote for The New Republic, he says
During my recent stint in the Obama administration as director of the Office of Management and Budget, it was clear to me that the country’s political polarization was growing worse—harming Washington’s ability to do the basic, necessary work of governing. If you need confirmation of this, look no further than the recent debt-limit debacle, which clearly showed that we are becoming two nations governed by a single Congress—and that paralyzing gridlock is the result.

So what to do? To solve the serious problems facing our country, we need to minimize the harm from legislative inertia by relying more on automatic policies and depoliticized commissions for certain policy decisions. In other words, radical as it sounds, we need to counter the gridlock of our political institutions by making them a bit less democratic. (Emphasis added: Crucis) The New Republic, Too Much of a Good Thing, Why we need less democracy, September 14, 2011 | 9:46 pm.
We’ve known all along the libs, leftists and dems really didn’t like our republic nor its institutions.  The Constitution, the principles behind those founding documents and the institutions created from them are impediments to the statists in both parties.
What they truly desire is an oligarchy of elites who governs the masses “for their betterment.”  

ol·i·gar·chyNoun/ˈäliˌgärkē/

1. A small group of people having control of a country, organization, or institution.

2. A state governed by such a group.

Of course the betterment always seems to be of the elite instead of masses they rule.  The operate word in that last sentence is “rule”, not govern.  There’s a difference.

Liberty? Democracy?  That’s for us, not for them, so says the elites.

***

Unbelievable. For a governor of a state to speak just a thing.  And, it public, too!

NC governor recommends suspending democracy to focus on jobs

As a way to solve the national debt crisis, North Carolina Democratic Gov. Beverly Perdue recommends suspending Congressional elections for the next couple of years.
“I think we ought to suspend, perhaps, elections for Congress for two years and just tell them we won’t hold it against them, whatever decisions they make, to just let them help this country recover,” Perdue said at a rotary club event in Cary, North Carolina, according to the Raleigh News and Observer. “I really hope that someone can agree with me on that.”
Perdue said she thinks that temporarily halting elections would allow members of Congress to focus on the economy. “You have to have more ability from Congress, I think, to work together and to get over the partisan bickering and focus on fixing things,” Perdue said.
North Carolina Republicans immediately scoffed at Perdue’s proposal, pointing out to her that elections hold politicians accountable for their actions. “Now is a time when politicians need to be held accountable more than ever,” North Carolina GOP spokesman Rob Lockwood said in an email to The Daily Caller. “To suspend an election would be removing the surest mechanism that citizens have to hold politicians accountable: The right to vote.”

 Do these people really want a civil war?  That’s what would happen as surely as the sun rises in the morning. 

…solve the national debt crises.”  The debt crises would be nothing compared to the new crises the dems, and anyone else supporting the idea, would have on their hands if they tried this.

Who’s Who in the current Libyan Air War

Obama said the US is doing little in the Euro War against Gadaffi.  Liar.  Take a look at this graphic to see who is more involved, the US or the Euros.
Click on the image to see it in its original size.  Then compare the number of Men, Ships and Aircraft involved and the number of sorties flown and cruise missiles expended.  Like I said, Obama is a liar.

Source: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:NU2nSQN27dUJ:www.izuba.info/w/spip.php%3Fpage%3Dart%26id_syndic_article%3D568519+Libya_Coalition_Sorties1200.jpg&cd=5&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=firefox-a&source=www.google.comhttp://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:NU2nSQN27dUJ:www.izuba.info/w/spip.php%3Fpage%3Dart%26id_syndic_article%3D568519+Libya_Coalition_Sorties1200.jpg&cd=5&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=firefox-a&source=www.google.com

Civil Wars

There are a number of “hot” topics in the news today.  It’s difficult to choose which draws my ire more than the rest.  There are some common threads being exposed—Civil War.  More explicitly, it’s a civil war by the unions against the welfare of the country and the non-union populace.

That war is being played most prominently in Wisconsin, Ohio and other states mired in the mess of public employee unions.  The union lost in Wisconsin despite the efforts of a judge and dem legislators bought by the union.  The battle still continues with this report of thuggery and intimidation by the police union.

Union threatens boycott of any business that doesn’t show support

Letters seek window signs supporting collective bargaining 

By Don Walker of the Journal Sentinel 

Members of the Wisconsin State Employees Union, AFSCME Council 24, have begun circulating letters to businesses in southeast Wisconsin, warning that they will face a boycott if they don’t support collective bargaining for public employee unions.

The letters ask businesses to express that support by displaying union signs in their windows.

“Failure to do so will leave us no choice but (to) do a public boycott of your business,” the letter says. “And sorry, neutral means ‘no’ to those who work for the largest employer in the area and are union members.”

They won in Indiana where the RINO governor caved to the unions and dem legislators in that state’s effort to pass Right to Work.  In other states are efforts to remove the state as collectors of union dues.

It now has been discovered that the Obamacare bills authorized a $2Bn slush fund to support public employees, unions and corporations to subsidize health care costs.  This is nothing more than using funds taken from taxpayers to subsidize a select few—who have historically supported the democrat party.

Can we say, “Pay off!”? 

Yes, we’re in a civil war. A war between the dems and their thuggish supporters against the rest of us. It’s a war to retain their parasitic hold and control of the country.  It’s a war that we must not lose.                                   

The Continuing Civil war in Mexico, Pt II

I’ve posted a number of times, here, here and here, about the Civil War next door. Our FedGov continues to turn a blind eye to that conflict and in some cases by omission, has aided the drug cartels. The dems refusal to protect our borders—specifically the southern one, is a planned action in the blind attempt to gain more illegal votes and to gain support by our legal Hispanic residents.

The dems are unconcerned that trading security for votes is a direct threat to our country.        

Anyone Notice The War Next Door?

Border: Remember when al-Qaida targeted tribal leaders and local officials to assert power in the Iraq War? Today, the story repeats itself on our own doorstep. But incredibly, the Beltway crowd doesn’t seem to care.
Mexico’s war against drug and alien-smuggling cartels grows ever more similar to the horrors of Afghanistan and Iraq. Beheadings, stonings, car bombs and terrorist attacks speak to a lust for power every bit as implacable as that of the Afghanistan’s Taliban or the insurgents of Iraq.
The cartels may seem to be just a police problem, but Mexico’s own officials know better: President Felipe Calderon warns that everything about their actions says they mean to take over.
But even with such a nearby threat, there are no U.S. crisis task forces or special envoys. The Northern Command hasn’t been bolstered. The unbuilt border fence is one excuse after another, hostage to domestic and electoral politics.
President Obama can’t even be bothered to visit the borderlands in Arizona, where, for the first time in history, U.S. control and sovereignty over our own territory is being ceded to foreign cartels.
Does anyone care that a cartel has threatened to destroy a dam in Texas? Oregon officials report huge new cartel marijuana fields on a scale never seen earlier.
The Los Angeles Police Department even warns that five cartels have set up logistics operations in America’s second-largest city.
It should be a national security crisis of the highest priority, right?
To Washington, it’s little more than a secondary back-burner issue. Our commitment to help is minuscule — about $400 million a year, way less than the estimated $8 billion to $25 billion that Latin American cartels make in U.S. drug profits each year.
As Mexico’s house burns, Washington interest is more attuned to whether Mexico’s military follows Marquess of Queensberry rules than actually winning the war.
This month, the State Department withheld $26 million in U.S. war aid for Mexico based on its assessment of Mexico’s human rights “progress,” apparently completely oblivious to the crisis.
Meanwhile, as Mexicans fight and die to keep drugs out of the U.S., Washington turns a blind eye to increasingly brazen transgressions of federal marijuana laws in U.S. states, even as it prosecutes Arizona for undercutting immigrant-smuggling cartels.

There’s more information at the IBD website here.

And don’t forget—an open border also allows Islamic and other terrorists free access to the interior of our country. This is an indictment against the democrat party and the Ruling Class.

Loss of Faith.

From Investor’s Business Daily

Democracy: It’s an awful thing in a country when its people no longer believe the government protects them and their rights. Yet, a new poll shows that’s exactly where Americans are headed right now.

In a Rasmussen poll of 1,000 adults taken last Friday and Saturday, nearly half, or 48%, said they see government today as a threat to their rights. Just 37% disagreed. The poll also found that only one in five (21%) believe current government has the consent of the governed.

In other words, people think much of what our government does today is illegitimate — possibly even illegal.

For a democratic republic such as our own, this is extraordinarily dangerous. The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were created explicitly to protect Americans’ rights by limiting the scope, reach and power of the federal government.

The Declaration promises “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,” and goes on to say that “to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.”

In short, our government was designed to protect our rights — not to serve as an all-embracing nanny state that slowly, silently strips us of our ability to act as free individuals.

Editorial, Investor’s Business Daily, June 24, 2010

There’s more at the website. What the column says is that we are in an extremely dangerous period in our country’s history. When the majority of the citizen’s of our nation believes that the government no longer represents the people and that nearly half of the country believes the government is dangerous and a threat to our rights and liberty, open revolt can occur at any spark.

Yes, a very dangerous time indeed.

The Continuing Civil War in Mexico

I don’t know how many of you monitor the Strategy Page website. I do frequently looking for info about the civil war in Mexico. My main purpose is to enlighten local churches who think that sending their kids to Mexico on “summer mission” trip is perfectly safe. On the contrary, the cartels in Mexico would like nothing more than to grab a much of juvenile gringos and hold them for ransom.

April 26, 2010: The U.S. government continues to be dismayed with the progress on the so-called virtual fence, the array of radar, image sensors, and acoustic sensors that was originally touted as the 21st century solution to border security. In March the Department of Homeland Security cut back on funding the virtual fence. Now a number of senior legislators want the project halted or scrapped, arguing regular, low-tech fencing is not only budget-friendly but more reliable. Two U.S. senators want to add another 3,000 Customs and Border Patrol agents to the border by 2015. The one thing everyone seem to agree is useful, including Mexican authorities, is Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). There are other UAVs besides Predator, but Predator has become the generic term for surveillance UAVs. UAVs are a psychological weapon. Smugglers (both dope and people smugglers) never know when they are being watched if there are UAVs operation in the area.

April 25, 2010: Mexican officials acknowledge that there is more Cartel War-related violence in the interior than there was last year. In other words, it has crept south from the border. The city of Monterrey and Mexico City have had their share of drug gang violence, but Monterrey has been the scene recently of some spectacular cartel slayings and shoot-outs. The government argues the cartels are launching the attacks in an attempt to shake-up the army and police, and damage the government’s credibility. Security officials say some of the violence amounts to battles between cartel lieutenants to fill senior leadership positions. A number of senior cartel leaders have been arrested or slain in the last eight months. The army has made life in the border trafficking zones very tough for the cartelistas. Police say they have pressurized the border and the pressure is going to increase over the next few months. Critics, however, argue the drug gangs are demonstrating that they can strike anywhere in the country. President Felipe Calderon has countered that argument by saying recently that the government is “not ceding any space to the criminals.”

April 24, 2010: Cartel gunmen used automatic rifles and grenades to ambush a convoy carrying a senior state security officer. Police said the gunmen also employed a .50 caliber (12.7mm) sniper rifle to shoot at the official’s armored SUV. The attack took place in Michoacan state. Four people were killed and ten wounded in the attack. Heavy .50 caliber sniper rifles are used as anti-vehicle weapons. The .50 caliber bullet has a great deal of stopping power. Originally, the U.S. .50 caliber M2 (“Ma Deuce”) heavy machine gun was designed as an anti-armored vehicle weapon.

April 23, 2010: Seven people were slain when cartel gunmen ambushed two police vehicles in Ciudad Juarez (Chihuahua state). Five of those killed were federal police officers and one was a city policeman. The other person was a civilian. There are around 5,000 federal police deployed in the Juarez region.

April 22, 2010: Approximately 50 cartel gunmen attacked a hotel in Monterrey (Nuevo Leon state) and kidnapped three people. The attack took place around three a.m. The gunmen drove up to the hotel in a convoy of stolen cars.

April 19, 2010: Government officials and diplomats are asking the U.S. to continue to improve cooperation with Mexican security agencies. Intelligence fusion centers with U.S. and Mexican agents and analysts are key to breaking up cartel operations, especially in the border regions. The Mexican government has come a long way from the days it rejected any overt cooperation with the U.S., calling the offer an attempt to undermine Mexican sovereignty. Mexican diplomats repeatedly point out that their government seeks international cooperation. However, the government riles at what it considers unfair criticism regarding corruption. Responding to charges from the U.S. that corruption in Mexico was hindering counter-drug efforts, Mexican officials argued that the U.S. is not doing enough to stem American demand for illegal narcotics.

April 17, 2010: U.S. Border Patrol agents fired at a vehicle that tried to run through a border checkpoint from Tijuana. The driver was later arrested.

April 15, 2010: U.S. and Mexican authorities confirm that cartel gunmen continue to launch attacks continue in the Juarez Valley area (east of Ciudad Juarez). Several hundred Mexican families have fled the area. Local authorities estimate at least 50 people from the area are now seeking asylum in the U.S.. Many family members have reported the drug gangs threaten to kill them if they stay in their homes. The valley is a major smuggling corridor from Mexico into Texas. At the moment most of the violence appears to be committed by the Sinaloa drug cartel. The Sinaloa cartel is fighting the Juarez cartel for control of smuggling routes in and around Juarez. It appears that the Sinaloa cartel is winning that fight. Most of the drug shipments now passing through the Juarez area are controlled by the Sinaloa cartel. The Sinaloa cartel works with two smaller enforcer gangs in the area, the Killer Artists and the Mexicles. Juarez has its own subsidiary enforcers, La Linea and Azteca.

April 9, 2010: U.S. congressional representatives told the Mexican government that they would try to speed up disbursement of Merida initiative funds. The Mexican government wants more helicopters and aircraft to fight the Cartel War.

April 1, 2010: Drug cartel gunmen attacked seven different targets in what authorities described as a coordinated series of assaults. The attacks took place in Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon states. Two of the attacks targeted Mexican Army garrisons, one in the city of Reynosa. Eighteen of the gunmen were slain by Mexican Army soldiers during those two attacks. A Mexican Army position near a major state highway in Nuevo Leon state was one of the other five sites assaulted. A firefight also occurred between soldiers manning a control point and cartel gunmen along the highway between Reynosa and Monterrey. The gunmen attacked the two garrisons using vehicles with bullet-proof armor, hand grenades, and automatic rifles.

The Continuing Civil War in Mexico

I don’t know how many of you monitor the Strategy Page website. I do frequently looking for info about the civil war in Mexico. My main purpose is to enlighten local churches who think that sending their kids to Mexico on “summer mission” trip is perfectly safe. On the contrary, the cartels in Mexico would like nothing more than to grab a much of juvenile gringos and hold them for ransom.

April 26, 2010: The U.S. government continues to be dismayed with the progress on the so-called virtual fence, the array of radar, image sensors, and acoustic sensors that was originally touted as the 21st century solution to border security. In March the Department of Homeland Security cut back on funding the virtual fence. Now a number of senior legislators want the project halted or scrapped, arguing regular, low-tech fencing is not only budget-friendly but more reliable. Two U.S. senators want to add another 3,000 Customs and Border Patrol agents to the border by 2015. The one thing everyone seem to agree is useful, including Mexican authorities, is Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). There are other UAVs besides Predator, but Predator has become the generic term for surveillance UAVs. UAVs are a psychological weapon. Smugglers (both dope and people smugglers) never know when they are being watched if there are UAVs operation in the area.

April 25, 2010: Mexican officials acknowledge that there is more Cartel War-related violence in the interior than there was last year. In other words, it has crept south from the border. The city of Monterrey and Mexico City have had their share of drug gang violence, but Monterrey has been the scene recently of some spectacular cartel slayings and shoot-outs. The government argues the cartels are launching the attacks in an attempt to shake-up the army and police, and damage the government’s credibility. Security officials say some of the violence amounts to battles between cartel lieutenants to fill senior leadership positions. A number of senior cartel leaders have been arrested or slain in the last eight months. The army has made life in the border trafficking zones very tough for the cartelistas. Police say they have pressurized the border and the pressure is going to increase over the next few months. Critics, however, argue the drug gangs are demonstrating that they can strike anywhere in the country. President Felipe Calderon has countered that argument by saying recently that the government is “not ceding any space to the criminals.”

April 24, 2010: Cartel gunmen used automatic rifles and grenades to ambush a convoy carrying a senior state security officer. Police said the gunmen also employed a .50 caliber (12.7mm) sniper rifle to shoot at the official’s armored SUV. The attack took place in Michoacan state. Four people were killed and ten wounded in the attack. Heavy .50 caliber sniper rifles are used as anti-vehicle weapons. The .50 caliber bullet has a great deal of stopping power. Originally, the U.S. .50 caliber M2 (“Ma Deuce”) heavy machine gun was designed as an anti-armored vehicle weapon.

April 23, 2010: Seven people were slain when cartel gunmen ambushed two police vehicles in Ciudad Juarez (Chihuahua state). Five of those killed were federal police officers and one was a city policeman. The other person was a civilian. There are around 5,000 federal police deployed in the Juarez region.

April 22, 2010: Approximately 50 cartel gunmen attacked a hotel in Monterrey (Nuevo Leon state) and kidnapped three people. The attack took place around three a.m. The gunmen drove up to the hotel in a convoy of stolen cars.

April 19, 2010: Government officials and diplomats are asking the U.S. to continue to improve cooperation with Mexican security agencies. Intelligence fusion centers with U.S. and Mexican agents and analysts are key to breaking up cartel operations, especially in the border regions. The Mexican government has come a long way from the days it rejected any overt cooperation with the U.S., calling the offer an attempt to undermine Mexican sovereignty. Mexican diplomats repeatedly point out that their government seeks international cooperation. However, the government riles at what it considers unfair criticism regarding corruption. Responding to charges from the U.S. that corruption in Mexico was hindering counter-drug efforts, Mexican officials argued that the U.S. is not doing enough to stem American demand for illegal narcotics.

April 17, 2010: U.S. Border Patrol agents fired at a vehicle that tried to run through a border checkpoint from Tijuana. The driver was later arrested.

April 15, 2010: U.S. and Mexican authorities confirm that cartel gunmen continue to launch attacks continue in the Juarez Valley area (east of Ciudad Juarez). Several hundred Mexican families have fled the area. Local authorities estimate at least 50 people from the area are now seeking asylum in the U.S.. Many family members have reported the drug gangs threaten to kill them if they stay in their homes. The valley is a major smuggling corridor from Mexico into Texas. At the moment most of the violence appears to be committed by the Sinaloa drug cartel. The Sinaloa cartel is fighting the Juarez cartel for control of smuggling routes in and around Juarez. It appears that the Sinaloa cartel is winning that fight. Most of the drug shipments now passing through the Juarez area are controlled by the Sinaloa cartel. The Sinaloa cartel works with two smaller enforcer gangs in the area, the Killer Artists and the Mexicles. Juarez has its own subsidiary enforcers, La Linea and Azteca.

April 9, 2010: U.S. congressional representatives told the Mexican government that they would try to speed up disbursement of Merida initiative funds. The Mexican government wants more helicopters and aircraft to fight the Cartel War.

April 1, 2010: Drug cartel gunmen attacked seven different targets in what authorities described as a coordinated series of assaults. The attacks took place in Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon states. Two of the attacks targeted Mexican Army garrisons, one in the city of Reynosa. Eighteen of the gunmen were slain by Mexican Army soldiers during those two attacks. A Mexican Army position near a major state highway in Nuevo Leon state was one of the other five sites assaulted. A firefight also occurred between soldiers manning a control point and cartel gunmen along the highway between Reynosa and Monterrey. The gunmen attacked the two garrisons using vehicles with bullet-proof armor, hand grenades, and automatic rifles.