It’s Thursday?

It’s been a busy week. Electioneering and the election earlier this week seemed to just soak up the time. The aftermath yesterday…checking the winners and losers, was busy as well. Some of my favorites won, some lost. It’s been a whirlwind and time has leaped in passing.

I woke up this morning thinking it was Wednesday. I had lain in bed thinking over the election results and some impacts when it occurred to me that I was repeating yesterday. 

That’s when I woke up.

***

In the run-up to the election, current events has been pushed aside.  Imagine my surprise to learn that Mexico has surrendered to the drug cartels!  Mexico’s PRI party regained control in the last election. Once in office, they promptly surrendered to the de facto government that rules large portions of the country.

Mexico Dissolves Its FBI, Moves to Legalize Drugs

by Chriss W. Street 1 Aug 2012

In a stunning development, President-elect Enrique Peña and his Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), who won control of Mexico’s government on July 1st, moved to dissolve the Agencia Federal de Investigación (AFI).  

Modeled after the United States FBI, the AFI was founded in 2001 to crack down on Mexico’s pervasive government corruption and drug trafficking. With rival drug cartels murdering between 47,500 to 67,000 Mexicans over the last six years, the move by the PRI represents the total surrender of Mexico’s sovereignty back to the money and violence of Mexico’s two main drug cartels, the Sinaloa Federation and Los Zetas. Coupled with the Obama Administration’s “Dreamer” Executive Order curtailing deportations of illegal aliens, a hands-off policy on both sides of the border foreshadows a huge increase in “narco-trafficking” violence and corruption flooding into the United States.    

The PRI ruled Mexico with an iron fist for 71 years between 1929 and 2000.  Although the PRI claimed they were the socialist peasant’s party, they operated as a corrupt political organization that siphoned off wealth from Mexico’s nationalized oil industry with bribes for protecting the drug cartels that trafficked in marijuana and narcotics into the United States. As a glaring example of the level of official PRI corruption, in 1982 the oil workers’ union donated a $2 million house as a “gift” to President López Portillo. Mexicans often joke: “Our Presidents are elected as millionaires, but they leave office as billionaires.” 

But on December 1, 2000, Vicente Fox, the former Chief Executive of Coca-Cola in Mexico and founder of the Partido Acción Nacional (PAN), was elected President of Mexico. Mr. Fox ran on a platform of reforming Mexico’s pervasive police corruption, and his first move as President was to form the AFI. Under the leadership of President Fox and his party’s successor, President Felipe Calderón, the AFI grew over the next 11 years into a 5,000-member force with an international reputation as a premier drug enforcement agency.  The U.S. provided extensive equipment and training to the AFI. The AFI reciprocated by capturing numerous drug kingpins and extraditing them to face criminal prosecution for murder and drug distribution in the U.S. 

Over the first six months of 2012, the Sinaloa Federation and Los Zetas carried out a vicious war across Mexico to expand their areas of operations and intimidate the local population. Both cartels engaged in “information operations campaigns” by displaying large numbers of dismembered bodies in public places. The shock value of body dumps was designed to broadcast that the cartels are the dominant authority in Mexico. 

The AFI under President Felipe Calderón retaliated against the major drug cartel kingpins’ horrific bloodshed by partnering with the U.S. and Guatemala to capture Horst Walther Overdick in Guatemala, followed by the capture of Francisco Treviño and Carlos Alejandro “El Fabiruchis” Gutierrez Escobedo and the killing of Gerardo “El Guerra” Guerra Valdez in Mexico, along with the capture of José Treviño in the U.S.

Two days after the election, President-elect Peña came to the U.S. to announce that he would “welcome debate on the issue of drug legalization and regulation in Mexico.”  In an interview by PBS News Hour, President-elect Pena clearly stated:

I’m in favor of opening a new debate in the strategy in the way we fight drug trafficking. It is quite clear that after several years of this fight against drug trafficking, we have more drug consumption, drug use and drug trafficking. That means we are not moving in the right direction. Things are not working.

These are “code words” to signal the PRI intends to cut a profitable deal with the cartels to legalize drugs in exchange for collecting tax revenue on drug sales. The month before, Congressman James Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.) called a Congressional hearing to accuse Peña Nieto of advocating “a reversion” back to the old PRI policies of “turning a blind eye to the cartels” as long as they weren’t perpetrating grisly violence.   

President-elect Peña’s announcement of the PRI’s new cozy relationship with the drug cartels directly followed President Obama’s announcement of his “Dreamer” Executive Order curtailing deportations of “undocumented” aliens. These actions have caused major alarm among rank-and-file border agents that the Sinaloa Federation and Los Zetas are now unrestrained to flood into the United States with drugs and violence. In a joint union press conference by the customs agents and the border patrol unions, Chris Crane, President of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Council (ICE) warned:  

It‘s impossible to understand the full scope of the administration’s changes, but what we are seeing so far concerns us greatly… There is no burden for the alien to prove anything.

No good will come from this. The security of our southern border has just become more critical than ever before.

***

Claire McCaskill ran an ad prior to the Missouri primary declaring Todd Akin to be, “a dangerous Tea Party extremist,” and, “outside the mainstream.” Various pundits believe she ran the ads because she, McCaskill, believed Akin was the easiest ‘Pub opponent to beat for the Senate.  Whatever her logic, it appears to have helped Akin win some votes in the primary. A quick scan of grassroots websites across the state appeared to confirm the opinions of those pundits.

Personally, I think Ol’ Claire made a strategic mistake.  Breitbart TV has this report.

Claire McCaskill Says Conservatives Are ‘Dangerous,’ ‘Outside of Mainstream’

by Dana Loesch 9 Aug 2012, 2:53 AM PDT

Claire McCaskill’s campaign wasted no time in attacking Todd Akin after his senate primary win. This evening McCaskill sent an email to supporters claiming that Akin is a “dangerous” tea party extremist:

Akin’s Rap Sheet Makes It Clear: Tea Party Congressman’s Outside Of The Mainstream Views, Dangerous Policies Are Wrong for Missouri, From his record to his rhetoric, everything about Todd Akin’s Tea Party policies are outside of the mainstream and dangerous for Missouri families.  

When Missouri Republicans nominated him last night,  they pinned their Senate hopes on a far right,  Tea Party Congressman whose candidacy diminishes the party’s prospects for November.

This coming from McCaskill, a Senator so far removed from the will of her people that after she championed for Obamacare in Missouri, 76% of voters voted to repudiate it via Proposition C. Prop C, or the Health Care Freedom Act, was the first legislative challenge to Obamacare. 

McCaskill again rubber-stamped the Obama agenda when she sided with him against Missouri jobs and coal by voting in favor of the MACT rule and effectively shutting the doors of numerous coal plants. McCaskill once claimed she hated coal, odd considering she represents a big coal state, the industry of which employs thousands. McCaskill has rubber-stamped the Obama agenda on most every policy that would adversely affect Missouri coal and jobs. 

McCaskill cheerleads for an administration that has quadrupled the deficit, run women from the job pool, and devalued the dollar, while trying to persuade seniors that the government knows best how handle their social security. McCaskill has never addressed why government-run social security is the best when that very same government spent it all. The idea that individuals should have a choice between their own responsibility or government irresponsibility is “extremist” to the incumbent. 

McCaskill also attacked Akin over oil subsidies while keeping mum on her support for green tech subsidies. (Akin, in fact, has before said on my show that such subsidies should cease.)

The Democrat incumbent is desperate to cast this race as Harry Reid v Sharon Angle except McCaskill has been trailing in the polls for the past several states, her state repudiated her efforts to cheerlead for Obama, and unlike Reid, McCaskill is attempting to legislate Missouri into the poorhouse with job-killing regulations. Dangerous and “outside of the mainstream?” That sounds like McCaskill.

One way or another, McCaskill will get what she asked for.

***

The Washington Times has a piece about illegal aliens that is putting to bed the excuse they are all productive and here only for jobs.  Truth be told, almost half are on the welfare rolls.  Just think of the savings that could be made if we just cleaned the rolls and limited welfare to US citizens?  Our parasite class is big enough as it is without importing more.

Slow path to progress for U.S. immigrants

43% on welfare after 20 years

By Stephen Dinan – The Washington Times, Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Immigrants lag behind native-born Americans on most measures of economic well-being — even those who have been in the U.S. the longest, according to a report from the Center for Immigration Studies, which argues that full assimilation is a more complex task than overcoming language or cultural differences.

The study, which covers all immigrants, legal and illegal, and their U.S.-born children younger than 18, found that immigrants tend to make economic progress by most measures the longer they live in the U.S. but lag well behind native-born Americans on factors such as poverty, health insurance coverage and homeownership.

The study, based on 2010 and 2011 census data, found that 43 percent of immigrants who have been in the U.S. at least 20 years were using welfare benefits, a rate that is nearly twice as high as native-born Americans and nearly 50 percent higher than recent immigrants.

The report was released at a time when both major presidential candidates have backed policies that would make it easier to immigrate legally and would boost the numbers of people coming to the U.S.

Federal law requires that the government deny immigrant visas to potential immigrants who are likely to be unable to support themselves and thereby become public charges.

On Tuesday, a handful of Republican senators wrote to the Homeland Security and State departments asking them to explain why they don’t consider whether potential immigrants would use many of the nearly 80 federal welfare programs when they evaluate visa applications.

Neither department responded to messages Tuesday seeking a response to the senators’ letter.

There is more in the complete article. I urge you to read it for yourself.

***

I read some reports today that Citibank, AT&T, and GE are shifting the majority of their contributions to the GOP.  In addition, so are their employees. Usually these corporations suck up to whomever they think will be the winner. They’ve made cozening an art form. Now, they’re abandoning Obama in the hope to gain favor when Romney is in charge.

Corporations are not the only ones. Unions see the writing on the wall, too. The United Mine Workers Association (UMWA), the coal miners union is sitting this election out.

In politics as well as the inevitable sycophants, self-interest is always the top priority.

The Continuing Civil War in Mexico

I don’t know how many of you monitor the Strategy Page website. I do frequently looking for info about the civil war in Mexico. My main purpose is to enlighten local churches who think that sending their kids to Mexico on “summer mission” trip is perfectly safe. On the contrary, the cartels in Mexico would like nothing more than to grab a much of juvenile gringos and hold them for ransom.

April 26, 2010: The U.S. government continues to be dismayed with the progress on the so-called virtual fence, the array of radar, image sensors, and acoustic sensors that was originally touted as the 21st century solution to border security. In March the Department of Homeland Security cut back on funding the virtual fence. Now a number of senior legislators want the project halted or scrapped, arguing regular, low-tech fencing is not only budget-friendly but more reliable. Two U.S. senators want to add another 3,000 Customs and Border Patrol agents to the border by 2015. The one thing everyone seem to agree is useful, including Mexican authorities, is Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). There are other UAVs besides Predator, but Predator has become the generic term for surveillance UAVs. UAVs are a psychological weapon. Smugglers (both dope and people smugglers) never know when they are being watched if there are UAVs operation in the area.

April 25, 2010: Mexican officials acknowledge that there is more Cartel War-related violence in the interior than there was last year. In other words, it has crept south from the border. The city of Monterrey and Mexico City have had their share of drug gang violence, but Monterrey has been the scene recently of some spectacular cartel slayings and shoot-outs. The government argues the cartels are launching the attacks in an attempt to shake-up the army and police, and damage the government’s credibility. Security officials say some of the violence amounts to battles between cartel lieutenants to fill senior leadership positions. A number of senior cartel leaders have been arrested or slain in the last eight months. The army has made life in the border trafficking zones very tough for the cartelistas. Police say they have pressurized the border and the pressure is going to increase over the next few months. Critics, however, argue the drug gangs are demonstrating that they can strike anywhere in the country. President Felipe Calderon has countered that argument by saying recently that the government is “not ceding any space to the criminals.”

April 24, 2010: Cartel gunmen used automatic rifles and grenades to ambush a convoy carrying a senior state security officer. Police said the gunmen also employed a .50 caliber (12.7mm) sniper rifle to shoot at the official’s armored SUV. The attack took place in Michoacan state. Four people were killed and ten wounded in the attack. Heavy .50 caliber sniper rifles are used as anti-vehicle weapons. The .50 caliber bullet has a great deal of stopping power. Originally, the U.S. .50 caliber M2 (“Ma Deuce”) heavy machine gun was designed as an anti-armored vehicle weapon.

April 23, 2010: Seven people were slain when cartel gunmen ambushed two police vehicles in Ciudad Juarez (Chihuahua state). Five of those killed were federal police officers and one was a city policeman. The other person was a civilian. There are around 5,000 federal police deployed in the Juarez region.

April 22, 2010: Approximately 50 cartel gunmen attacked a hotel in Monterrey (Nuevo Leon state) and kidnapped three people. The attack took place around three a.m. The gunmen drove up to the hotel in a convoy of stolen cars.

April 19, 2010: Government officials and diplomats are asking the U.S. to continue to improve cooperation with Mexican security agencies. Intelligence fusion centers with U.S. and Mexican agents and analysts are key to breaking up cartel operations, especially in the border regions. The Mexican government has come a long way from the days it rejected any overt cooperation with the U.S., calling the offer an attempt to undermine Mexican sovereignty. Mexican diplomats repeatedly point out that their government seeks international cooperation. However, the government riles at what it considers unfair criticism regarding corruption. Responding to charges from the U.S. that corruption in Mexico was hindering counter-drug efforts, Mexican officials argued that the U.S. is not doing enough to stem American demand for illegal narcotics.

April 17, 2010: U.S. Border Patrol agents fired at a vehicle that tried to run through a border checkpoint from Tijuana. The driver was later arrested.

April 15, 2010: U.S. and Mexican authorities confirm that cartel gunmen continue to launch attacks continue in the Juarez Valley area (east of Ciudad Juarez). Several hundred Mexican families have fled the area. Local authorities estimate at least 50 people from the area are now seeking asylum in the U.S.. Many family members have reported the drug gangs threaten to kill them if they stay in their homes. The valley is a major smuggling corridor from Mexico into Texas. At the moment most of the violence appears to be committed by the Sinaloa drug cartel. The Sinaloa cartel is fighting the Juarez cartel for control of smuggling routes in and around Juarez. It appears that the Sinaloa cartel is winning that fight. Most of the drug shipments now passing through the Juarez area are controlled by the Sinaloa cartel. The Sinaloa cartel works with two smaller enforcer gangs in the area, the Killer Artists and the Mexicles. Juarez has its own subsidiary enforcers, La Linea and Azteca.

April 9, 2010: U.S. congressional representatives told the Mexican government that they would try to speed up disbursement of Merida initiative funds. The Mexican government wants more helicopters and aircraft to fight the Cartel War.

April 1, 2010: Drug cartel gunmen attacked seven different targets in what authorities described as a coordinated series of assaults. The attacks took place in Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon states. Two of the attacks targeted Mexican Army garrisons, one in the city of Reynosa. Eighteen of the gunmen were slain by Mexican Army soldiers during those two attacks. A Mexican Army position near a major state highway in Nuevo Leon state was one of the other five sites assaulted. A firefight also occurred between soldiers manning a control point and cartel gunmen along the highway between Reynosa and Monterrey. The gunmen attacked the two garrisons using vehicles with bullet-proof armor, hand grenades, and automatic rifles.

The Continuing Civil War in Mexico

I don’t know how many of you monitor the Strategy Page website. I do frequently looking for info about the civil war in Mexico. My main purpose is to enlighten local churches who think that sending their kids to Mexico on “summer mission” trip is perfectly safe. On the contrary, the cartels in Mexico would like nothing more than to grab a much of juvenile gringos and hold them for ransom.

April 26, 2010: The U.S. government continues to be dismayed with the progress on the so-called virtual fence, the array of radar, image sensors, and acoustic sensors that was originally touted as the 21st century solution to border security. In March the Department of Homeland Security cut back on funding the virtual fence. Now a number of senior legislators want the project halted or scrapped, arguing regular, low-tech fencing is not only budget-friendly but more reliable. Two U.S. senators want to add another 3,000 Customs and Border Patrol agents to the border by 2015. The one thing everyone seem to agree is useful, including Mexican authorities, is Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). There are other UAVs besides Predator, but Predator has become the generic term for surveillance UAVs. UAVs are a psychological weapon. Smugglers (both dope and people smugglers) never know when they are being watched if there are UAVs operation in the area.

April 25, 2010: Mexican officials acknowledge that there is more Cartel War-related violence in the interior than there was last year. In other words, it has crept south from the border. The city of Monterrey and Mexico City have had their share of drug gang violence, but Monterrey has been the scene recently of some spectacular cartel slayings and shoot-outs. The government argues the cartels are launching the attacks in an attempt to shake-up the army and police, and damage the government’s credibility. Security officials say some of the violence amounts to battles between cartel lieutenants to fill senior leadership positions. A number of senior cartel leaders have been arrested or slain in the last eight months. The army has made life in the border trafficking zones very tough for the cartelistas. Police say they have pressurized the border and the pressure is going to increase over the next few months. Critics, however, argue the drug gangs are demonstrating that they can strike anywhere in the country. President Felipe Calderon has countered that argument by saying recently that the government is “not ceding any space to the criminals.”

April 24, 2010: Cartel gunmen used automatic rifles and grenades to ambush a convoy carrying a senior state security officer. Police said the gunmen also employed a .50 caliber (12.7mm) sniper rifle to shoot at the official’s armored SUV. The attack took place in Michoacan state. Four people were killed and ten wounded in the attack. Heavy .50 caliber sniper rifles are used as anti-vehicle weapons. The .50 caliber bullet has a great deal of stopping power. Originally, the U.S. .50 caliber M2 (“Ma Deuce”) heavy machine gun was designed as an anti-armored vehicle weapon.

April 23, 2010: Seven people were slain when cartel gunmen ambushed two police vehicles in Ciudad Juarez (Chihuahua state). Five of those killed were federal police officers and one was a city policeman. The other person was a civilian. There are around 5,000 federal police deployed in the Juarez region.

April 22, 2010: Approximately 50 cartel gunmen attacked a hotel in Monterrey (Nuevo Leon state) and kidnapped three people. The attack took place around three a.m. The gunmen drove up to the hotel in a convoy of stolen cars.

April 19, 2010: Government officials and diplomats are asking the U.S. to continue to improve cooperation with Mexican security agencies. Intelligence fusion centers with U.S. and Mexican agents and analysts are key to breaking up cartel operations, especially in the border regions. The Mexican government has come a long way from the days it rejected any overt cooperation with the U.S., calling the offer an attempt to undermine Mexican sovereignty. Mexican diplomats repeatedly point out that their government seeks international cooperation. However, the government riles at what it considers unfair criticism regarding corruption. Responding to charges from the U.S. that corruption in Mexico was hindering counter-drug efforts, Mexican officials argued that the U.S. is not doing enough to stem American demand for illegal narcotics.

April 17, 2010: U.S. Border Patrol agents fired at a vehicle that tried to run through a border checkpoint from Tijuana. The driver was later arrested.

April 15, 2010: U.S. and Mexican authorities confirm that cartel gunmen continue to launch attacks continue in the Juarez Valley area (east of Ciudad Juarez). Several hundred Mexican families have fled the area. Local authorities estimate at least 50 people from the area are now seeking asylum in the U.S.. Many family members have reported the drug gangs threaten to kill them if they stay in their homes. The valley is a major smuggling corridor from Mexico into Texas. At the moment most of the violence appears to be committed by the Sinaloa drug cartel. The Sinaloa cartel is fighting the Juarez cartel for control of smuggling routes in and around Juarez. It appears that the Sinaloa cartel is winning that fight. Most of the drug shipments now passing through the Juarez area are controlled by the Sinaloa cartel. The Sinaloa cartel works with two smaller enforcer gangs in the area, the Killer Artists and the Mexicles. Juarez has its own subsidiary enforcers, La Linea and Azteca.

April 9, 2010: U.S. congressional representatives told the Mexican government that they would try to speed up disbursement of Merida initiative funds. The Mexican government wants more helicopters and aircraft to fight the Cartel War.

April 1, 2010: Drug cartel gunmen attacked seven different targets in what authorities described as a coordinated series of assaults. The attacks took place in Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon states. Two of the attacks targeted Mexican Army garrisons, one in the city of Reynosa. Eighteen of the gunmen were slain by Mexican Army soldiers during those two attacks. A Mexican Army position near a major state highway in Nuevo Leon state was one of the other five sites assaulted. A firefight also occurred between soldiers manning a control point and cartel gunmen along the highway between Reynosa and Monterrey. The gunmen attacked the two garrisons using vehicles with bullet-proof armor, hand grenades, and automatic rifles.

Civil War in Mexico.

To paraphrase Bill Shakespeare, a Civil War is a Civil War no matter what name is used.

I’ve posted a number of times in the last year about the violence in Mexico. When a local church group proposed sending some of their youth to Mexico on a mission trip, I strongly advised against it. It’s just too dangerous a territory for the innocent and unaware to travel. The American Spectator supports my opinion in an article published Friday. What was once a war between drug cartels is now the cartels against the Mexican government for control of the county. And, as far as I can tell, the cartels are winning.

From the American Spectator, February 5, 2010.

Civil War By Any Other Name

There it is in plain sight — a full-scale civil war in Mexico that continues to be downplayed by Washington as just another battle among rival drug traffickers. Treated by the State Department and Homeland Security as simply a domestic criminal problem across the border, this no-holds-barred insurgency threatens the existence of all phases of legal governance in a large portion of the United States’ southern neighbor.

The importance of stability in Mexico for the U.S. easily can be seen in the crucial fact that Mexico is the source of close to one million barrels per day of oil imported into the United States — third only behind Canada and Saudi Arabia.

There is no higher level of terrorism worldwide than that which exists today in Mexico. A conscious effort is in process by the drug cartels to take over the physical areas of northern and portions of central Mexico, replacing existing governmental forms with their own deadly justice. This organized criminal contest now has grown to constitute a form of civil war that isn’t much different in effect from what is taking place in the Caucasus, Congo, southern Philippines or even Afghanistan.

How many people have to be killed before the White House will accept the fact that a full scale insurgency exists within this strategically vital country to the south of the U.S. In 2009, the Associated Press estimated drug battle deaths added up to more than 6,500. Just in the key manufacturing city of Ciudad Juarez across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas, local officials have reported that approximately 2,600 people died last year in the fighting. In the past three years Mexican official figures conservatively set deaths occurring in this conflict on all sides as nearing 15,000.

What began as turf wars among the six major drug cartels has escalated into a major conflict between governmental forces (police and military) and the several equally well-armed organizations of the narcotics monopolies. And here is where further complications are added, for it repeatedly has been reported that uniformed soldiers have been active as drug cartel enforcers. Other press reports indicate battles between the local police and soldiers for control of given smuggling routes. The stories of cartel, police and military interaction run the gamut from business-like to bizarre.

Law enforcement sources in the four American border states of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California are unanimous in their intelligence concerning the character of the war itself. All agree that the brutality of the fighting where few are left wounded is matched by the bestiality of the drug cartels’ methods of interrogation and revenge. Beheadings and body mutilation are now the norm. When a federal police officer was exposed by name after he was killed during a raid, his entire family — wife, children, and parents — was assassinated as a lesson to other federales.

President Felipe Calderon has decided that the local police forces cannot be trusted and that their collaboration with the drug cartels can be stopped only by their removal. His announced aim is to replace all the local police with state police, who are presumably less vulnerable to cartel blandishments and coercion. This means creating 32 major police instruments (31 states and Mexico City) to carry on the current jurisdiction of 2,022 municipal entities and their 160,907 town and city cops.

The physical and legal challenge of this strategy requires a congressional mandate and subsequent hiring and training program of enormous size. It is planned, however, that the better educated of the metro forces will be converted into state police. As 68% of Mexico’s municipal police force has only a ninth grade education (according to the Mexican Office of Public Safety), this will be quite a job indeed.

Calderon’s objective is eventually to remove the Mexican Army from its internal policing role, which now reportedly occupies 45,000 soldiers out of a total army force structure of 230,000. The problem with such a plan is that the current security cooperation agreement between the United States and Mexico that includes funding of $1.4 billion over several years is heavily oriented to having the Mexican military assume a continuing role in combating drug trafficking.

A new and expensive assistance mechanism between the two countries will have to be created to provide the financial and technical aid the central government in Mexico City needs. Meanwhile, in addition to the 450,000 people estimated by official American sources to be employed directly by the drug cartels in cultivation, processing, and smuggling, there may be multiples of that number indirectly involved. The entire illegal business revenue has been reckoned in the region of $25 billion.

As long as this self-funding mechanism continues, so will Mexico’s countrywide war against itself. How long will the United States accept the dangers of having a criminally contested state on its border?

George H. Wittman is a member of the Committee on the Present Danger and was the founding chairman of the National Institute for Public Policy.

The US government has ignored the events south of the border. When Obama visited Mexico last year, instead of doing anything to strengthen our border and the Mexican government, he blamed US gun shows for arming the cartels. The fact was that most of the arms to the cartels came indirectly from the US government. Arms provided by the US to the Mexican military and subsequently stolen for, bought by, or delivered to the drug cartels.

Much of that equipment—fully automatic weapons, crew-served weapons, and explosives, aren’t generally available to the US public except under stringent conditions and licensing. Obama felt it was easier to blame US citizens rather than do anything productive for our national security. It’s a typical pattern by Obama, democrats and liberals in our government. It’s better to blame the US than to take actions that might not be approved by the media, the despots in the UN, and our enemies around the world. Yes, blame us. It’s easier than taking action.

Mexican government crackdown on cartels as 5,500 troops descend on state at centre of drug war

More in the continuing collapse of the nation of Mexico.

Mexican government crackdown on cartels as 5,500 troops descend on state at centre of drug war

By Mail Foreign Service
Last updated at 8:30 AM on 22nd July 2009

Thousands of heavily armed soldiers have been deployed in Mexico in the government’s latest efforts to crack down on the country’s drug war. Troops set up roadblocks on major highways in the western state of Michoacan on Saturday in response to a series of drug gang attacks on police. Armed with automatic weapons, soldiers wearing ski masks to shield their identities searched vehicles for signs of drug smuggling after the government ordered 5,500 troops to deploy to the area by land, sea and air in the marijuana-growing region, also the President’s home state.

Soldiers stand at attention before starting a military operation at the military base in Morelia

Horrific violence: Michoacan has become the epicentre of Mexico’s drug war, and residents in the regional capital Morelia told how local forces had reached their limits.


Soldiers stand at attention before starting a military operation at the military base in Morelia

Drug war: The Mexican government has deployed 5,500 troops to search the western state of Michoacan for signs of drug smuggling in response to a series of drug gang attacks on police

The surge, one of the biggest in the three-year drug war, came after drug gangs targeted federal police following the capture of a high-ranking member of the local La Familia cartel.

Last week members of the cartel dumped the tortured and blood-smeared bodies of 12 federal police in a heap by a remote highway – the latest victims in the violent war that has killed over 12,800 people since President Felipe Calderon came to power in 2006.

A horrific film allegedly showing the policemen being stripped, beaten and executed was briefly posted on YouTube, the El Universal newspaper reported.

Soldiers stand at attention before starting a military operation at the military base in Morelia

Attacks: The surge is one of the biggest in the three-year drug war, and was launched after drug gangs targeted federal police following the capture of a high-ranking member of the local La Familia cartel

Ten municipal police officers from Michoacan were being held in custody on Saturday, suspected of collaborating with the cartel in the murders, the Mexican attorney general’s office said.

The state has become the epicentre of the country’s drug war, and residents in the regional capital Morelia told how local forces had reached their limits.

Last September suspected drug gang hit men threw two grenades into a packed crowd celebrating Mexico’s independence day.

‘We’ve reached a point where the local authorities are tapped out, and so unfortunately it’s necessary to call in extra forces to try and restore the peace to Michoacan,’ said Gerardo Gomez, a Morelia resident.

Mexican government crackdown on cartels as 5,500 troops descend on state at centre of drug war

More in the continuing collapse of the nation of Mexico.

Mexican government crackdown on cartels as 5,500 troops descend on state at centre of drug war

By Mail Foreign Service
Last updated at 8:30 AM on 22nd July 2009

Thousands of heavily armed soldiers have been deployed in Mexico in the government’s latest efforts to crack down on the country’s drug war. Troops set up roadblocks on major highways in the western state of Michoacan on Saturday in response to a series of drug gang attacks on police. Armed with automatic weapons, soldiers wearing ski masks to shield their identities searched vehicles for signs of drug smuggling after the government ordered 5,500 troops to deploy to the area by land, sea and air in the marijuana-growing region, also the President’s home state.

Soldiers stand at attention before starting a military operation at the military base in Morelia

Horrific violence: Michoacan has become the epicentre of Mexico’s drug war, and residents in the regional capital Morelia told how local forces had reached their limits.


Soldiers stand at attention before starting a military operation at the military base in Morelia

Drug war: The Mexican government has deployed 5,500 troops to search the western state of Michoacan for signs of drug smuggling in response to a series of drug gang attacks on police

The surge, one of the biggest in the three-year drug war, came after drug gangs targeted federal police following the capture of a high-ranking member of the local La Familia cartel.

Last week members of the cartel dumped the tortured and blood-smeared bodies of 12 federal police in a heap by a remote highway – the latest victims in the violent war that has killed over 12,800 people since President Felipe Calderon came to power in 2006.

A horrific film allegedly showing the policemen being stripped, beaten and executed was briefly posted on YouTube, the El Universal newspaper reported.

Soldiers stand at attention before starting a military operation at the military base in Morelia

Attacks: The surge is one of the biggest in the three-year drug war, and was launched after drug gangs targeted federal police following the capture of a high-ranking member of the local La Familia cartel

Ten municipal police officers from Michoacan were being held in custody on Saturday, suspected of collaborating with the cartel in the murders, the Mexican attorney general’s office said.

The state has become the epicentre of the country’s drug war, and residents in the regional capital Morelia told how local forces had reached their limits.

Last September suspected drug gang hit men threw two grenades into a packed crowd celebrating Mexico’s independence day.

‘We’ve reached a point where the local authorities are tapped out, and so unfortunately it’s necessary to call in extra forces to try and restore the peace to Michoacan,’ said Gerardo Gomez, a Morelia resident.